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Legal Issues in Conservation Working Group
Triennial Programme 2014-2017

 

Working Group Activities and Projects 2014–2017:

In the triennium 2014-2017 Working Group will continue to broaden its focus to cover the important and sensitive legal issues which conservators face in their work. To this end, the Working Group will:

  • conduct a survey to determine which issues are of concern to conservators;
  • increase the involvement of its members;
  • issue at least one newsletter a year in 2015 and 2016;
  • use its web forum (or other media that fit with the Directory Board’s communication strategy) for discussions among members concerning legal issues that concern them or with which they are confronted;
  • conduct an interim meeting in 2015 or 2016. Discussions have been opened with the Modern Materials and Contemporary Art Working Group to conduct a joint meeting on the rights of living artists;
  • encourage more member papers at the 2017 ICOM-CC Triennial Conference in Copenhagen, where possible, related to the conference theme Linking Past and Future. Based on the success of the Socratic Dialogue held at the working Group session during the Melbourne Triennial Conference, should session time be available, we propose conducting a dialogue the next Triennial Conference.

 

Specific themes of research /investigations

 Issues which continue to be of current interest include:

  • authenticity and forgeries: questions of authenticity and the legal and ethical responsibilities of the conservator who encounters a forged cultural object;
  • conservation liability;
  • copyrights: the duties and responsibilities of the conservator toward living artists or artists’ estates;
  • endangered species: the legal and ethical responsibilities of the conservator who encounters cultural objects made with such materials (possibly in conjunction with the Ethnographic Collections and Natural History Collections Working Groups);
  • insurance and indemnity issues related to loans;
  • ownership and provenance: the legal and ethical responsibilities of the conservator who encounters cultural objects whose possession or title is in dispute, whether these objects are subject to repatriation (World War II and others) or were obtained through illegal trafficking.

 

 

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